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Thursday, September 14, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Stockton Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants gained final legislative approval today and will now head to the Governor’s desk.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

As excerpted from The Orange County Register. 

“Women are paid less than men, even when they are doing the same work,” said California Assembly member Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), author of a bill to bar employers from seeking applicants’ salary history.

“Women negotiating a salary shouldn’t have to wrestle an entire history of wage disparity. This bill gives women the power to determine for themselves where they start negotiating.”

The legislation, AB 168, applies to both men and women, but it is aimed at narrowing the gender pay gap. According to the U.S. Census, California women earn 84 cents for every dollar a man is paid, slightly more than the U.S. average of 79 cents.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

As excerpted from The Record.

Expressing her unbridled support, Assemblywoman Susan Talamantes Eggman, D-Stockton, addressed the rally, noting early on that “it’s good to see us out here today, although it’s sad that we’re coming out here because we need to raise our voices. But raise our voices we must.”

Eggman shared that on Monday, her 8-year-old daughter was watching the History Channel and asked her why the U.S. fought during World War II. Eggman related it to today’s fight.

“We stand up against people destroying other people’s lives just so they could get ahead, and now 75 years later and we see the KKK marching in our streets and we see the president of our United States defending them and saying there is good people on all sides."

Monday, July 10, 2017

(Sacramento) -  Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton) wrote Assembly Bill 208 to allow for pre-trial diversion.  Instead of having to plead guilty first before obtaining treatment for a nonviolent misdemeanor drug offenses, a defendant would, at a judge’s discretion, be able to obtain treatment without having to plead guilty.  The problem is deferred entries do not protect defendants from federal consequences, including deportations for non-citizen residents. According to a Syracuse University study, since 2008, over 250,000 people have been deported from the U.S. for nonviolent drug offenses. Here’s Assemblymember Eggman presenting AB 208 to the State Assembly in this Assembly Access video.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

As excerpted from the Los Angeles Times. 

A bill in Sacramento would allow eight selected counties, including Los Angeles, to try the idea out. Not only is the philosophy of safe injection centers consistent with California’s efforts to treat addiction as a disease not a crime, but a pilot project would gather invaluable data. The proposal by Assemblywoman Susan Eggman (D-Stockton) comes up for a crucial vote in a state Senate committee hearing in early July.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

(Sacramento) – Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton) and the State Assembly passed House Resolution 41 declaring June as LGBT Pride Month in California and held a special ceremony honoring ten LGBT individuals and the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus in appreciation of their outstanding accomplishments, leadership and activism to help advance equality for the LGBT community. Speaking on behalf of herself and the Legislative Latino Caucus, Assemblymember Eggman said, "A lot of people when they "come out" fear rejection from their families.

Friday, June 2, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to allow cities and counties in California to authorize supervised drug consumption programs passed from the Assembly floor Thursday evening.

Monday, May 22, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Stockton Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants passed the Assembly on Monday with a strong, bipartisan majority.

The bill, Assembly Bill 168, prohibits employers from asking for or seeking the salary history of a job applicant, either personally or through an intermediary. It also requires employers to disclose to an applicant, upon request, the pay scale for a position.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants, a practice that contributes to women being paid less than their male co-workers, passed a key committee Wednesday.

Assembly Bill 168 prohibits employers from asking for or looking for the salary history of a job applicant, either personally or through an intermediary. It also requires employers to disclose to an applicant, upon request, the pay scale for a position.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

(Sacramento) – Equal pay for equal work legislation, authored by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), was among the items featured when the California Legislative Women’s Caucus (LWC) unveiled its legislative priorities at a State Capitol news conference. The announcements came on Equal Pay Day, highlighting the pay disparities of women in the workforce who, in California, aren’t expected to earn parity until 2043 earing $.78 to a white man’s dollar.  “Women are already paid less than men, for the same work and because professions where women predominate are undervalued, using salary history to determine compensation is double-baking inequality into the system,” said Assemblymember Eggman. “Assembly Bill 168 gives women the power to determine for themselves where they start negotiating.” Here’s more in this Assembly Access video.