News

Saturday, September 1, 2018

As excerpted from the Stockton Record.

A $7 billion bond measure that could have funded a California State University, Stockton died on the state Assembly floor Friday. Partially because the CSU system didn’t support it.

Feel free to join me in being irritated with the California State University Chancellor’s Office. The chancellor supported a rival, $4 billion bond measure that would fund repairs to existing CSU and University of California campuses but build no new ones.

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So what now? Eggman and her co-authors will reintroduce the bill next year. Brown will be termed out; gubernatorial frontrunner Gavin Newsom supports a CSU, Stockton.

Eggman and others will push for creation of an independent office that determines objectively when a new CSU is needed, and where.

Monday, April 30, 2018

As excerpted from The Record.

AB2771 has exciting potential. Assemblywoman Susan Eggman, D-Stockton, has co-authored this $7 billion university bond. The Higher Education Facilities Bond Act of 2018 would address billions of dollars in capital needs and long-postponed maintenance at aging University of California and California State campuses.
 
And it would include enough extra moola to fund three new campuses. Including, say, a California Polytechnic University, Stockton. Or a plain old Stockton State.
 
“Can I automatically say we’re going to get a campus with this?” said Eggman. “I don’t know that I can say that. But I can say it puts us a whole lot closer to the goal line, with money on the table.”
 
The bill won bipartisan approval this week in the Assembly Higher Education Committee.
Wednesday, February 7, 2018
As excerpted from the Christian Science Monitor.
 
The Golden State may produce more solar energy than anywhere else in the country, but when it comes to being green, there are “two Californias,” says Assemblywoman Susan Eggman.
 
The mountainous “spine” of central California, as Ms. Eggman likes to call it, is very different from the coast: there are more low-income households, higher electricity bills, and more expensive estimates for solar panel installation.
 
To bring California’s green reputation to places like her hometown of Stockton, Calif., Eggman created the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing (SOMAH) program. Under Assembly Bill 693, the program fully subsidizes solar panels on multifamily buildings that are located in disadvantaged areas, have a number of federally subsidized units, or where the majority of tenants earn less than 60 percent of the area’s average income. 
Wednesday, January 17, 2018

As excerpted from The Record. 

Eggman, joined by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, who represents Chula Vista, fired off a letter to CSU Chancellor Timothy White that probably steamed itself open.

The letter said they found the spokesman’s comment “incredibly disturbing.”

“We would hope that the CSU — the people’s university — values the students coming from all areas of the state, and that our communities not be discarded with a chuckle or a question about whether students could bear to attend.”

Saturday, December 16, 2017
As excerpted from the Mercury News.
 
The bill creating the program — carried by Assemblywoman Susan Eggman, D-Stockton — was signed into law in 2015. Since then, it has undergone a halting regulatory process at the Public Utilities Commission, which this week approved the final regulations.
 
Lazero said she hoped that the first panels would be installed in the fall of 2018.
 
Co-sponsoring Eggman’s bill was the California Solar Energy Industries Association, which notes the challenge of installing solar panels on any multi-unit apartment building is far greater than on a single-family home, especially for a building housing low-income tenants.
Thursday, November 9, 2017

As excerpted from the Sacramento Bee.

The planned 158,000-square-foot, four-floor VA facility just outside Stockton is supposed to offer top-notch, patient-focused services, including primary care, mental health, physical therapy, prosthetics and dental. But under the current schedule, construction won’t start until late 2018 or early 2019. The first patient won’t be treated until summer 2022.
 
That isn’t soon enough for Assemblywoman Susan Talamantes Eggman, the latest official to raise a stink about the long wait.
Monday, November 6, 2017

As excerpted from The Record.

The Knolls were part of a group of about 20 from the Stockton area who rode in a chartered bus to Palo Alto on Monday morning to remind Department of Veterans Affairs officials there of the need for more medical and psychological services in the Central Valley. Stockton Assemblywoman Susan Eggman organized the excursion to Palo Alto after collecting nearly 2,000 signed cards from residents calling for additional services closer to home.
 
“We need to keep this in the public eye,” said Eggman, who noted that Saturday is Veteran’s Day and added, “Silence makes bureaucracy not move.”