News

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

As excerpted from The Mercury News.

California employers would be barred from asking job applicants about their prior salaries if Gov. Jerry Brown signs into law a new bill seeking to close the state’s gender pay gap.

“Nobody denies it’s a real issue,” said Assembly member Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), who introduced the bill. “I think the remedies are what people debate about. And since it’s remained stubborn and hasn’t really moved, then why not try something that has been tried around the country?”

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

As excerpted from Capital & Main.

Many harm-reduction programs are already legal in California. You can buy testing kits, for example, and needle-exchange programs qualify for federal funding. But one of the most effective strategies, practiced in Europe and Canada, remains implicitly against state and federal law, despite evidence from other countries that it works: dedicated facilities where people can come to use their drugs in a safe, hygienic environment in the company of trained medical staff. “They increase the amount of people who get into treatment, they increase the amount of people who stay clean, decrease the amount of people who are contracting HIV, Hepatitis, and those kinds of things,” Assemblymember Susan Eggman (D-Stockton) told a press conference on International Overdose Awareness Day, August 31.
Thursday, September 28, 2017

As excerpted from the Sacramento Bee. 

The state fined a Santa Monica nursing home for claiming a resident received physical therapy five days a week. At least 28 of those sessions were documented by nurse assistants who were not at work on those days. In Los Angeles, lawyers for a woman who was severely re-injured at a convalescent home discovered that nonexistent nurses made entries in her chart.
 
All that was detailed by The Sacramento Bee’s Marjie Lundstrom in 2011. Now, after failed legislative attempts in past years, Gov. Jerry Brown can correct this inequity by signing Assembly Bill 859 by Assemblywoman Susan Eggman, D-Stockton. The bill would help expose and thus discourage what was, until Lundstrom came along, a largely untold story of falsification of patient records in nursing homes.
Thursday, September 28, 2017

As excerpted from KCRA News. 

A tragic skydiving accident in Lodi that took the lives of two jumpers in 2016 influenced a new law that aims to make owners and operators of skydiving facilities more accountable when things go wrong.
 
The bill -- known as Tyler’s Law -- was introduced by Stockton Assemblywoman Susan Eggman and was signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown over the weekend.
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

As excerpted from the Lodi News-Sentinel.

California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law over the weekend a bill that was spurred by deaths at the Lodi Parachute Center. Assembly Bill 295, authored by Assemblywoman Susan Eggman (D-Stockton) and also known as Tyler’s Law, will hold parachute centers accountable in state court if they fail to abide by federal safety regulations.
Monday, September 25, 2017

As excerpted from the Tracy Press. 

Final approval of AB 758, co-authored by Assemblywomen Susan Eggman, D-Stockton, and Catharine Baker, R-Dublin, was given Sept. 15 by the state Assembly and by the state Senate early Sept. 16. 
 
Tracy Mayor Pro Tem Veronica Vargas, who has been a leader of the committee that was formed several years ago to push for the establishment of the cross-Altamont rail authority, said she was at the state Capitol in Sacramento when both branches of the Legislature approved AB 758.

 

Thursday, September 7, 2017

As excerpted from The Orange County Register. 

“Women are paid less than men, even when they are doing the same work,” said California Assembly member Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), author of a bill to bar employers from seeking applicants’ salary history.

“Women negotiating a salary shouldn’t have to wrestle an entire history of wage disparity. This bill gives women the power to determine for themselves where they start negotiating.”

The legislation, AB 168, applies to both men and women, but it is aimed at narrowing the gender pay gap. According to the U.S. Census, California women earn 84 cents for every dollar a man is paid, slightly more than the U.S. average of 79 cents.