LATEST NEWS

Thursday, June 22, 2017

(Sacramento) – Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton) and the State Assembly passed House Resolution 41 declaring June as LGBT Pride Month in California and held a special ceremony honoring ten LGBT individuals and the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus in appreciation of their outstanding accomplishments, leadership and activism to help advance equality for the LGBT community. Speaking on behalf of herself and the Legislative Latino Caucus, Assemblymember Eggman said, "A lot of people when they "come out" fear rejection from their families.

Friday, June 2, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to allow cities and counties in California to authorize supervised drug consumption programs passed from the Assembly floor Thursday evening.

Monday, May 22, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Stockton Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants passed the Assembly on Monday with a strong, bipartisan majority.

The bill, Assembly Bill 168, prohibits employers from asking for or seeking the salary history of a job applicant, either personally or through an intermediary. It also requires employers to disclose to an applicant, upon request, the pay scale for a position.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman to ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants, a practice that contributes to women being paid less than their male co-workers, passed a key committee Wednesday.

Assembly Bill 168 prohibits employers from asking for or looking for the salary history of a job applicant, either personally or through an intermediary. It also requires employers to disclose to an applicant, upon request, the pay scale for a position.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

(Sacramento) – Equal pay for equal work legislation, authored by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton), was among the items featured when the California Legislative Women’s Caucus (LWC) unveiled its legislative priorities at a State Capitol news conference. The announcements came on Equal Pay Day, highlighting the pay disparities of women in the workforce who, in California, aren’t expected to earn parity until 2043 earing $.78 to a white man’s dollar.  “Women are already paid less than men, for the same work and because professions where women predominate are undervalued, using salary history to determine compensation is double-baking inequality into the system,” said Assemblymember Eggman. “Assembly Bill 168 gives women the power to determine for themselves where they start negotiating.” Here’s more in this Assembly Access video.

Monday, March 20, 2017

SACRAMENTO – Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman, D-Stockton on Monday announced legislation to make tuition at California’s community colleges and public universities free for state residents.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman, D-Stockton, speaks to a crowd rallying at the State Capitol on the occasion of Women's History Month.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

SACRAMENTO – A bill introduced Tuesday by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman would ban employers from seeking the salary history of job applicants, a practice that contributes to women being paid less than their male co-workers.

The bill, AB 168, prohibits employers from asking for or looking for the salary history of a job applicant, either personally or through an intermediary. A provision also requires employers to disclose to an applicant, upon request, the pay scale for a position.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

The funds approved by the California Strategic Growth Council are designed to help Californians drive less and reduce the greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change.

Friday, September 23, 2016

SACRAMENTO – Governor Jerry Brown on Thursday signed into law a bill by Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton) to enable the recycling of cathode ray tube (CRT) glass, found in now obsolete televisions and monitors.

The growing availability and affordability of digital flat screen TVs and monitors has rendered CRT technology obsolete in the U.S. As people upgrade to digital displays, they discard their old televisions and monitors.